UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

[X] QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2020

 

or

 

[  ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ____________________ to ____________________

 

Commission File Number: 000-56025

 

Quanta, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada   81-2749032

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

     
3606 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank, CA   91505
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code): (424) 261-2568

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer [  ]   Accelerated filer [  ]
Non-accelerated filer [  ]   Smaller reporting company [X]
    Emerging growth company [X]

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [  ] No [X]

 

As of June 19, 2020, the registrant had 56,900,978 shares of Common Stock outstanding.

 

 

 

 
 

  

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
PART I FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
ITEM 1. Financial Statements  
  Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets - March 31, 2020 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2019 3
     
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations (Unaudited) - Three Months Ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 4
     
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity (Unaudited) - Three Months Ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 5
     
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Unaudited) - Three Months Ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 6
     
  Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) – Three Months Ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 7
     
ITEM 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 16
ITEM 3. Quantitative And Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 22
ITEM 4. Controls And Procedures 22
PART II OTHER INFORMATION 23
ITEM 1 Legal Proceedings 23
ITEM 1A. Risk Factors 23
ITEM 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 23
ITEM 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities 23
ITEM 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 23
ITEM 5. Other Information 23
ITEM 6. Exhibits 24
     
Signatures   25

 

2

 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Information.

 

QUANTA, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(amounts in thousands, except share amounts)

 

    March 31, 2020     December 31, 2019  
    (Unaudited)      
ASSETS                
Current assets:                
Cash   $ 47     $ 433  
Accounts receivable     19       28  
Inventories     143       123  
Prepaid expenses     -       7  
Total current assets     209       591  
                 
Equipment, net     342       313  
Operating lease right-of-use asset     723       333  
Deposits     64       34  
                 
Total assets   $ 1,338     $ 1,271  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)                
Current liabilities:                
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   $ 128     $ 74  
Notes payable     48       56  
Deferred revenue, license agreement     20       33  
Operating lease liabilities, short-term     163       86  
Convertible note payable (net of discount of $225)     236       57  
Derivative liabilities     680       400  
Total current liabilities     1,275       706  
                 
Long term liabilities                
Deferred revenue, licenses agreement, long-term     40       34  
Operating lease liabilities, long-term     567       252  
Total liabilities     1,882       992  
                 
Stockholders’ equity (deficit):                
Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 25,000,000 shares authorized; non issued or outstanding     -       -  
Common stock, $0.001 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized; 54,198,366 and 49,087,255 shares issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively     55       49  
Shares to be issued (2,943,519 and 7,318,519 as of March 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively)     2,774       2,848  
Additional paid-in capital     6,224       5,620  
Accumulated deficit     (9,597 )     (8,238 )
Total stockholders’ equity     (544)       279  
                 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity   $ 1,338     $ 1,271  

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

3

 

  

QUANTA, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(amounts in thousands, except share and per share amounts)

(Unaudited)

 

   

Three months ended

March 31, 2020

   

Three months ended

March 31, 2019

 
    (Unaudited)     (Unaudited)  
Sales, net   $ 351     $ 224  
License Revenue     6       6  
Total revenue     357       230  
Cost of goods sold     28       59  
Gross profit     329       171  
                 
Operating expenses:                
Employee compensation and contractors     382       187  
Selling, general, and administrative     912       163  
Research and development     78       -  
Total operating expenses     1,372       350  
Loss from operations     (1,043 )     (179 )
                 
Other income (expense):                
Change in value of derivative liability     135       -  
Private placement cost     (262 )     -  
Interest expense     (189 )     (4 )
Other income and expense, net     (316 )     (4 )
                 
Net loss   $ (1,359 )   $ (183 )
                 
Net loss per share, basic and diluted   $ (0.02 )   $ (0.00 )
Weighted average common shares outstanding – basic and diluted     56,182,340       39,200,090  

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

4

 

 

QUANTA, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

(amounts in thousands, except share amounts)

(Unaudited)

 

Three months ended March 31, 2020 (Unaudited)
   Common Stock, par value $0.001   Additional             
   Number of shares   Amount   paid-in capital   Shares to be issued   Accumulated deficit   Total 
Balance, December 31, 2019   49,087,255   $49   $5,620   $2,848   $(8,238)  $279 
Issuance of shares   5,000,000    5    495    (500)   -    - 
Shares issued for cash   111,111    1    29    -    -    30 
Fair value of vested options   -    -    80    -    -    80 
Fair value of shares for services                  426    -    426 
Net loss   -    -         -    (1,359)   (1,359)
Balance, March 31, 2020 (Unaudited)   54,198,366   $55   $6,224   $2,774   $(9,597)  $(544)

 

Three months ended March 31, 2019 (Unaudited)
   Common Stock, par value $0.001   Additional             
   Number of shares   Amount   paid-in capital   Shares to be issued   Accumulated deficit   Total 
Balance, December 31, 2018   39,200,000   $39   $2,361   $306   $(2,450)  $256 
Cash received for shares to be issued                  173         173 
Net loss   -    -         -    (183)   (183)
Balance, March 31, 2019 (Unaudited)   39,200,000   $39   $2,361   $479   $(2,633)  $246 

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

5

 

 

QUANTA, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(amounts in thousands)

(Unaudited)

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31, 2020
   Three Months Ended
March 31, 2019
 
    (Unaudited)    (Unaudited) 
           
CASH FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:          
Net loss  $(1,359)  $(183)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:          
Depreciation   51    29 
Fair value of shares for services   426    - 
Fair value of vested options   80    - 
Amortization of convertible note discount   179    - 
Change in fair value of derivative   (135)   - 
Private placement costs   262    - 
Amortization of right-of-use asset   42    19 
Interest accrual   -    4 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   9    2 
Inventories   (20)   - 
Prepaid Expenses   7    - 
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   54    (6)
Deferred revenue   (7)   94 
Operating lease liabilities   (40)   (11)
Net cash used in operating activities   (451)   (52)
           
CASH FLOW FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:          
Deposits   (30)   - 
Purchase of equipment   (80)   (70)
Net cash used in investment activities   (110)   (70)
           
CASH FLOW FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
Proceeds from convertibles notes payable   153    - 
Proceeds from notes payable   -    (17)
Principal payments of notes payable   (8)   13 
Proceeds from shares issued for cash   30    173 
Net cash provided by financing activities   175    169 
           
Increase (decrease) in cash   (386)   47 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period   433    36 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period  $47   $83 
           
Supplemental Disclosures of Cash Flow Information:          
Cash paid for taxes   -    - 
Cash paid for interest   -    - 
           
Non-cash investing and financing activities          
Derivative liabilities allocated to convertible note discount   153    - 
Recognition of operating lease right-of-use asset and operating lease liabilities  $431   $410 

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

6

 

 

QUANTA, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2020 AND 2019 (UNAUDITED)

(Amounts in thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 

NOTE 1 – DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Quanta, Inc. (the “Company”) is an applied science company focused on increasing energy levels in plant matter to increase performance within the human body. The Company’s operations are based in Burbank, California. On April 28, 2016, the Company was incorporated as Freight Solution, Inc. in the State of Nevada. Effective June 6, 2018, the Company (then known as Bioanomaly Inc.) was acquired by Freight Solution in a transaction accounted for as a reverse merger transaction. On July 11, 2018, the Company changed its name to Quanta, Inc.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. As reflected in the accompanying financial statements, for the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Company incurred a net loss of $1,359 and used cash in operating activities of $453, and at March 31, 2020, the Company had a had a working capital deficiency of $1,066. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year of the date that the financial statements are issued. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary if the Company is unable to continue as a going concern.

 

At March 31, 2020, the Company had cash on hand in the amount of $47. Subsequent to March 31, 2020 the Company received $357 from the issuance of a convertible note payable and $80 for subscriptions to purchase shares of common stock. Management estimates that the current funds on hand will be sufficient to continue operations through the next six months. The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon improving its profitability and the continuing financial support from its shareholders. Management believes the existing shareholders or external financing will provide the additional cash to meet the Company’s obligations as they become due. No assurance can be given that any future financing, if needed, will be available or, if available, that it will be on terms that are satisfactory to the Company. Even if the Company is able to obtain additional financing, if needed, it may contain undue restrictions on its operations, in the case of debt financing, or cause substantial dilution for its stockholders, in the case of equity financing

 

Basis of presentation and principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements as of and for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) for interim financial information and with the rules and regulations of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) to Form 10-Q and Article 8 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by U.S. GAAP for complete financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring accruals) considered necessary for a fair presentation of the financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the interim periods have been included. The results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2020 are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations to be expected for the full fiscal year ending December 31, 2020. The Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet information as of December 31, 2019 was derived from the Company’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements as of and for year ended December 31, 2019, included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K/A filed with the SEC on April 10, 2020. These financial statements should be read in conjunction with that report.

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Quanta Inc, and its wholly owned subsidiary, Bioanomaly, Inc. Intercompany transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

7

 

  

COVID-19

 

The global outbreak of COVID-19 has negatively affected the U.S. and global economies, and has negatively impacted businesses, workforces, customers, and created significant volatility of financial markets. It has also disrupted the normal operations of many businesses, including ours. The extent of the impact of the pandemic on our business and financial results will depend largely on future developments, including the duration and severity of the outbreak, the length of restrictions and business closures, and the impact on capital and financial markets, all of which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted. This outbreak could decrease spending, adversely affect demand for our products and harm our business and results of operations. While it is not possible at this time to estimate the full impact that COVID-19 will have on our business, restrictions resulting from COVID-19 on general economic conditions could, among other things, impair our ability to raise capital when needed. This situation is changing rapidly, and additional impacts may arise that we are not aware of currently.

 

Use of estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Significant accounting estimates include certain assumptions related to, among others, allowance for doubtful accounts receivable, impairment analysis of long-term assets, valuation allowance on deferred income taxes, assumptions used in valuing stock instruments issued for services, assumptions made in valuing derivative liabilities, and the accrual of potential liabilities. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

 

Revenue

 

The Company follows the guidance of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. ASC 606 creates a five-step model that requires entities to exercise judgment when considering the terms of contracts, which includes (1) identifying the contracts or agreements with a customer, (2) identifying our performance obligations in the contract or agreement, (3) determining the transaction price, (4) allocating the transaction price to the separate performance obligations, and (5) recognizing revenue as each performance obligation is satisfied. The Company only applies the five-step model to contracts when it is probable that the Company will collect the consideration it is entitled to in exchange for the services it transfers to its clients.

 

Product Sales—Revenue from sales of the Company’s CBD products is recognized at the point in time when the Company’s performance obligations with the applicable customers have been satisfied. Revenue is recorded at the transaction price, which is the amount of consideration the Company expects to receive in exchange for transferring products to a customer. Generally, the Company’s performance obligations are transferred to the customer at a point in time, typically upon delivery of products. The Company historically has offered no discounts, rebates, rights of return, or other allowances to clients which would result in the establishment of reserves against revenue. The Company sells its products (i) directly to customers (“DTC”) through online orders from our websites, and DTC sales at conventions and events; and (ii) through wholesalers, including physicians, pharmacies, fitness studios, grocery stores, and other organizations.

 

License revenue— Revenue from symbolic IP is recognized over the access period to the Company’s IP (see Note 2).

 

Cost of goods sold includes direct costs and fees related to the sale of our products.

 

Leases

 

Effective January 1, 2019, the Company adopted the guidance of ASC 842, Leases, which requires an entity to recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for virtually all leases. The Company determines if an arrangement contains a lease at the inception of the contract. Right-of-use (“ROU”) assets represent the Company’s right to use an underlying asset for the lease term while lease liabilities represent our obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease. All leases with terms greater than twelve months result in the recognition of a ROU asset and a liability at the lease commencement date based on the present value of the lease payments over the lease term. Leases with terms of twelve months or less at the commencement date are expensed on a straight-line basis over the lease term and do not result in the recognition of an asset or liability (see Note 5).

 

8

 

 

Derivative Financial Instruments

 

The Company evaluates its financial instruments to determine if such instruments are derivatives or contain features that qualify as embedded derivatives. For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported in the statements of operations. For stock-based derivative financial instruments, the Company uses a probability weighted average Black-Scholes-Merton model to value the derivative instruments at inception and on subsequent valuation dates through the March 31, 2020, reporting date. The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is evaluated at the end of each reporting period

 

Stock Compensation

 

The Company periodically issues stock options and restricted stock awards to employees and non-employees in non-capital raising transactions for services and for financing costs. The Company accounts for such grants issued and vesting based on ASC 718, whereby the value of the award is measured on the date of grant and recognized as compensation expense on the straight-line basis over the vesting period. The Company recognizes the fair value of stock-based compensation within its Statements of Operations with classification depending on the nature of the services rendered.

 

The fair value of the Company’s stock options is estimated using a Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model, which uses certain assumptions related to risk-free interest rates, expected volatility, expected life of the stock options or restricted stock, and future dividends. Compensation expense is recorded based upon the value derived from the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model and based on actual experience. The assumptions used in the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model could materially affect compensation expense recorded in future periods.

 

Advertising costs

 

Advertising costs are expensed as incurred. During the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, advertising costs totaled $34 and $2, respectively.

 

Research and Development Costs

 

Costs incurred for research and development are expensed as incurred. During the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, research and development costs totaled $78 and $0, respectively and include salaries, benefits, and overhead costs of personnel conducting research and development of the Company’s products.

 

Net Loss per Share

 

Basic net loss per share is computed by dividing net loss available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. At March 31, 2020, shares used in the calculation of basic net loss per common share include 2,559,066 of vested but unissued shares underlying awards of restricted common stock. Diluted loss per share reflects the potential dilution, using the treasury stock method that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted in the issuance of common stock that then shared in the loss of the Company. In computing diluted loss per share, the treasury stock method assumes that outstanding warrants and convertible notes are exercised and the proceeds are used to purchase common stock at the average market price during the period. Warrants and convertible notes may have a dilutive effect under the treasury stock method only when the average market price of the common stock during the period exceeds the exercise price of the options and warrants.

 

9

 

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2020, the dilutive impact of stock options exercisable into 3,290,000 shares of common stock, 5,125,000 shares of unvested restricted common stock, and convertible notes payable that can convert into 889,469 shares of common stock have been excluded from calculation of weighted average shares because their impact on the loss per share is anti-dilutive.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company follows the authoritative guidance issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) for fair value measurements. Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. A fair value hierarchy was established, which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value into three broad levels as follows:

 

Level 1—Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

Level 2—Inputs, other than the quoted prices in active markets, that are observable either directly or indirectly.

Level 3—Unobservable inputs based on the Company’s assumptions.

 

The Company is required to use of observable market data if such data is available without undue cost and effort.

 

The Company believes the carrying amount reported in the balance sheet for cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, and notes payable, approximate their fair values because of the short-term nature of these financial instruments

 

As of March 31, 2020, the Company’s balance sheet includes Level 2 liabilities comprised of the fair value of embedded derivative liabilities of $68 (see Note 8).

 

Concentrations of risks

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, no customer accounted for 10% or more of revenue. As of March 31, 2020, one customer accounted for 35% of accounts receivable. As of December 31, 2019, two customers accounted for 19% and 12% of accounts receivable, respectively. No other customer accounted for 10% or more of accounts receivable.

 

As of March 31, 2020, two vendors accounted for 63% and 36% of accounts payable, respectively, and no other vendor accounted for 10% or more of accounts payable. As of March 31, 2019 no vendor accounted for 10% or more of accounts payable.

 

The Company maintains the majority of its cash balances with one financial institution, in the form of demand deposits that are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or FDIC. At times, deposits held may exceed the amount of insurance provided by the FDIC. The Company has not experienced any losses in its cash and believes it is not exposed to any significant credit risk.

 

Segments

 

The Company operates in one segment for the development and distribution of our CBD products. In accordance with the “Segment Reporting” Topic of the ASC, the Company’s chief operating decision maker has been identified as the Chief Executive Officer and President, who reviews operating results to make decisions about allocating resources and assessing performance for the entire Company. Existing guidance, which is based on a management approach to segment reporting, establishes requirements to report selected segment information quarterly and to report annually entity-wide disclosures about products and services, major customers, and the countries in which the entity holds material assets and reports revenue. All material operating units qualify for aggregation under “Segment Reporting” due to their similar customer base and similarities in economic characteristics; nature of products and services; and procurement, manufacturing and distribution processes. Since the Company operates in one segment, all financial information required by “Segment Reporting” can be found in the accompanying financial statements.

 

10

 

  

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments (Topic 326). ASU 2016-13 requires entities to use a forward-looking approach based on current expected credit losses (“CECL”) to estimate credit losses on certain types of financial instruments, including trade receivables. This may result in the earlier recognition of allowances for losses. ASU 2016-13 is effective for the Company beginning January 1, 2023, and early adoption is permitted. The Company does not believe the potential impact of the new guidance and related codification improvements will be material to its financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Other recent accounting pronouncements issued by the FASB, including its Emerging Issues Task Force, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and the Securities and Exchange Commission did not or are not believed by management to have a material impact on the Company’s present or future consolidated financial statements.

 

NOTE 2 – LICENSE AGREEMENT

 

Effective January 22, 2019, the Company entered into an agreement with a wholesaler for the exclusive rights to distribute the Company’s products in the state of Colorado for three years. In consideration, the Company received an up-front payment of $100. The Company determined that the exclusive distribution agreement was a distinct agreement for the license of symbolic IP and thus should be recognized on a straight-line basis over the three-year life of the agreement. For the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company recognized revenue related to this agreement in the amount of $6 and $6, respectively.

 

NOTE 3 – INVENTORIES

 

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost (first-in, first-out) or net realizable value, and consisted of the following:

 

    March 31, 2020     December 31, 2019  
       
Raw materials and packaging   $ 111     $ 102  
Finished goods     32       20  
                 
    $ 143     $ 122  

 

NOTE 4 - EQUIPMENT

 

Equipment, stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation consisted of the following:

 

    March 31, 2020     December 31, 2019  
             
Machinery-technology equipment   $ 705     $ 607  
Machinery-technology equipment under construction     13       30  
      718       637  
Less accumulated depreciation     (375 )     (324)  
                 
    $ 343     $ 313  

 

Depreciation expense for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 was $52 and $29, respectively. As of March 31, 2020, the equipment under construction is approximately 50% complete, and is expected to be completed and placed into service during the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

NOTE 5 - OPERATING LEASES

 

At December 31, 2019, the Company had one operating lease for its headquarters office space in Burbank, California that expires on July 31, 2023.

 

11

 

 

In February 2020, the Company took possession of a second leased facility consisting of office, research, and production space also located in Burbank, California. The lease commenced on January 1, 2020, and has a term for 5 years, with annual fixed rental payments ranging from $90 to $101. The aggregate total fixed rent is approximately $478 and resulted in the recognition of an operating lease right-of-use (“ROU”) asset and of corresponding lease liability of approximately $430 each. The Company also paid a security deposit of $16. At March 31, 2020, the Company did not have any other leases.

 

ROU assets and lease liabilities are recognized at commencement date based on the present value of lease payments over the lease term. Generally the implicit rate of interest in arrangements is not readily determinable and the Company utilizes its incremental borrowing rate in determining the present value of lease payments. The Company’s incremental borrowing rate is a hypothetical rate based on its understanding of what its credit rating would be. The operating lease ROU asset includes any lease payments made and excludes lease incentives.

 

The components of lease expense and supplemental cash flow information related to leases for the period are as follows:

 

   

Three months ended

March 31, 2020

 
   

(in thousands)

Lease Cost        
Operating lease cost (included in selling, general, and administrative expense in the Company’s statement of operations)   $ 50  
         
Other Information        
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities for 2020   $ 38  
Weighted average remaining lease term – operating leases (in years)     3.5  
Average discount rate – operating leases     4 %

 

The supplemental balance sheet information related to leases for the period is as follows:

 

    At March 31, 2020  
Operating leases        
Long-term right-of-use assets   $ 723  
         
Short-term operating lease liabilities   $ 163  
Long-term operating lease liabilities     567  
Total operating lease liabilities   $ 730  

 

Maturities of the Company’s lease liabilities are as follows:

 

Year Ending   Operating Leases  
2020   $ 150  
2021     186  
2022     202  
2023     172  
2024     101  
Total lease payments     811  
Less: Imputed interest/present value discount     (81 )
Present value of lease liabilities     730  
Less current portion     (163 )
Operating lease liabilities, long-term   $ 567  

 

Lease expenses were $50 and $3 during the three months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

12

 

 

NOTE 6 – NOTES PAYABLE

 

    March 31, 2020     December 31, 2019  
             
Note payable, interest at 8.3% per annum, secured by all the assets of the Company. The note was due January 13, 2019 and on April 24, 2020, the note holder waived the default through December 31, 2020.   $ 48     $ 56  
                 
Total notes payable (all current portion)   $ 48     $ 56  

 

NOTE 7 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE

 

At December 31, 2019, one convertible note for $282 was outstanding. The outstanding note is unsecured, bears interest at 12%, and is due April 29, 2020.

 

In February 2020, the Company issued another unsecured convertible promissory note for $153, bearing interest at 22% per annum, and maturing in February 2021. At the option of the holder, the note is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock at a price per share discount of 39% of the average market price of the Company’s common stock, as defined. As a result, the Company determined that the conversion option of the convertible note was not considered indexed to the Company’s own stock and characterized the fair value of the conversion feature as a derivative liability upon issuance. The Company determined that upon issuance of the convertible note, the initial fair value of the embedded conversion features totaled $415 (see Note 8), of which $153 was recorded as debt discount offsetting the face amount of the convertible note, and the remainder of $262 was recorded as private placement costs.

 

At December 31, 2019, the balance of unamortized discount on convertible notes was $225. During the three months ended March 31, 2020, debt discount of $153 was recorded and debt discount amortization of $179 was recorded. At March 31, 2020, the balance of the unamortized discount was $199.

 

Note 8 – DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

 

At March 31, 2020, the Company had convertible promissory notes outstanding that are convertible into shares of common stock of the Company at the option of the holder at price per share discounts of 39% of the Company’s common stock market price, as defined in the note agreements. As the ultimate determination of shares to be issued upon conversion of these notes could exceed the current number of available authorized shares, the Company determined that the conversion features of the convertible notes were not considered indexed to the Company’s own stock and characterized the fair value of the conversion features as derivative liabilities. Accordingly, the conversion features of the notes were separated from the host contracts (i.e. the notes) and characterized as derivative liabilities to be re-measured at the end of every reporting period with the change in value reported in the statement of operations.

 

At December 31, 2019, the balance of the derivative liabilities was $400. During the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Company recorded additions of $415 related to the conversion features of notes issued during the period (see Note 7), and a decrease in fair value of derivatives of $135. At December 31, 2019, the balance of the derivative liabilities was $680.

 

The derivative liabilities were valued at the following dates using a probability weighted Black-Scholes-Merton model with the following assumptions:

 

   

March 31,

2020

   

February 2020

(date of inception)

   

December 31,

2019

 
Conversion feature:                  
Risk-free interest rate     0.17 %   0.17 %     1.8 %
Expected volatility     237 %   249 %     222 %
Expected life (in years)   1 year     1 year     1 year  
Expected dividend yield     -       -       -  
                         
Fair Value:     -       -       -  
Conversion feature   $ 680     $ 415     $ 400  

 

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The risk-free interest rate was based on rates established by the Federal Reserve Bank. The expected volatility is based on the historical volatility of the Company’s stock. The expected life of the conversion feature of the notes was based on the remaining terms of the related notes. The expected dividend yield was based on the fact that the Company has not customarily paid dividends to its common stockholders in the past and does not expect to pay dividends to its common stockholders in the future.

 

NOTE 10 – STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Company issued 111,111 shares of common stock in a private placement of shares at a price of $0.27 per share for total proceeds of $30.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company received $173 for subscriptions to purchase 345,750 shares of its common stock in a private placement at a price of $0.50 per share

 

NOTE 11 – STOCK BASED COMPENSATION

 

Restricted common stock

 

On May 20, 2019, the Company agreed to issue 8,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock with vesting terms to a consultant for services. 1,000,000 shares vested immediately, and the balance of 7,000,000 shares will vest 625,000 shares per quarter over 2.8 years. In the event the consultants service with the Company terminates, any or all of the shares of common stock held by such recipient that have not vested as of the date of termination are forfeited to the Company in accordance with such restricted grant agreement.

 

The total fair value of the 8,000,000 shares was determined to be $4 based on the price per shares of a contemporaneous private placement of the Company’s common stock on the date granted. The Company accounts for the share awards using a graded vesting attribution method over the requisite service period, as if each tranche were a separate award. During the three months ended March 31, 2020, total share-based expense recognized related to vested restricted shares totaled $426. At March 31, 2020, there was $1,256 of unvested compensation related to these awards that will be amortized over a remaining vesting period of 2.0 years.

 

The following table summarizes restricted common stock activity for the year ended March 31, 2020:

 

    Number of shares    

Fair value of shares

(in thousands)

 
Non-vested shares, December 31, 2019     5,750,000     $ 1,682  
Granted     -       -  
Vested     (625,000 )     (426 )
Forfeited     -       -  
Non-vested shares, March 31, 2020     5,125,000     $ 1,256  

 

As of March 31, 2020, no shares have been issued and 2,875,000 vested shares are included in shares to be issued on the accompanying financial statements

 

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Stock Options

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company issued options exercisable into 3,290,000 shares of common stock. 1,800,000 options vested immediately, and the balance of 1,490,000 options vest over various periods up to four years. The options have an exercise price of $0.23 per share, and expire in ten years. Total fair value of these options at grant date was approximately $1,179. As of December 31, 2019, the amount of unvested compensation related to stock options was approximately $468. During the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Company recognized $80 of compensation expense relating to vested stock options. As of March 31, 2020, the amount of unvested compensation related to stock options was approximately $388 which will be recorded as an expense in future periods as the options vest.

 

A summary of stock option activity during the three months ended March 31, 2020:

 

   Number of options  

Weighted Average

Exercise Price

  

Contractual

Life in Years

 
Options Outstanding as of December 31, 2019   3,290,000   $0.23    6.0 
Granted   -    -    - 
Exercised   -    -    - 
Expired   -    -    - 
Options Outstanding as of March 31, 2020   3,290,000    0.23    6.0 
Options Exercisable as of March 31, 2020   1,800,000   $0.23    5.5 

 

NOTE 12 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

The Company has an agreement with an individual in consideration of the Company’s exclusive use of patented technology developed by the individual. Pursuant to the agreement, as amended, the Company shall pay a royalty of 25% of all the net income from the sale of licensed products, as defined with a minimum royalty of $350 per month payable in cash or common stock of the Company. In addition, the Company agreed to issue 8,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock with vesting terms to the individual (see Note 11). During the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Company paid $75 to the individual.

 

NOTE 13 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

In April and May 2020, the Company issued 451,198 shares of common stock with a fair value of approximately $22 to employees for services.

 

In April and May 2020, the Company entered into two financing agreements secured by the Company’s equipment. The Company received total proceeds of $395, and the financing agreements are due in 2 years.

 

In April 2020, a convertible note payable for $282 was paid off. As part of this transaction, 100,000 shares of the Company’s common stock were issued to the note holder as a fee.

 

In April and May 2020, the Company issued a convertible note payable for $357. The convertible note accrues interest at 10% per annum, is unsecured, matures December 31, 2020, and is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock at $0.05 per share. As part of this transaction, the Company issued as a commitment fee 705,000 shares of its common stock to the note holder. In June 2020, $45 of the convertible notes were converted into 900,117 shares of the Company’s common stock.

 

In April and May 2020, the Company agreed to issue 296,297 shares of common stock for $0.27 a share, resulting in total proceeds of $80.

 

In May, 2020 the Company issued 250,000 shares of common stock with a fair value of approximately $28 to a consultant for services.

 

In May, 2020, the Company borrowed $134 under the Paycheck Protection Program from the Small Business Administration which will provide additional economic relief during the COVID-19 pandemic. The loan may be fully forgiven should the funds be used for payroll related costs, mortgage interest, rent and utilities, as long as our employee headcount remains consistent with our baseline period following the date the loan was received, otherwise the loan will be repaid over two years following a six month deferral. We intend to use the funds primarily to cover payroll related cost.

 

In June 2020, the Company received an Economic Injury Disaster Loan of $160 from the Small Business Administration which will provide economic relief during the COVID-19 pandemic. This loan advance is not required to be repaid, has no stipulations on use, and we intend to use the funds for general corporate purposes.

 

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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

This form 10-Q contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. For this purpose any statements contained in this Form 10-Q that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. Without limiting the foregoing, words such as “may”, “will”, “expect”, “believe”, “anticipate”, “estimate” or “continue” or comparable terminology are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These statements by their nature involve substantial risks and uncertainties, and actual results may differ materially depending on a variety of factors, many of which are not within our control. These factors include by are not limited to economic conditions generally and in the industries in which we may participate; competition within our chosen industry, including competition from much larger competitors; technological advances and failure to successfully develop business relationships.

 

This discussion contains forward-looking statements that reflect our plans, estimates and beliefs. Our actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements.

 

Overview

 

Quanta is an applied science company focused on increasing energy levels in plant matter to increase performance within the human body. Our proprietary technology uses quantum mechanics to increase bio-activity of targeted molecules to enhance the desired effects. We specialize in potentiating rare naturally occurring elements to create impactful and sustainable healing solutions that we believe will one day be as powerful and predictable as pharmaceutical drugs.

 

We offer our technology as a platform, making it accessible to existing high-quality product makers with existing distribution channels, as well as consumer products. Our mission is to power as many impactful, high-performing and wholly organic solutions as possible through product lines and a series of licensing and distribution partnerships.

 

Bioanomaly Inc. was founded in 2016 by a group of technology and industry entrepreneurs and provides licensed technology solutions to natural product companies in multiple verticals. Our headquarters is located in Burbank, California.

 

Quanta Basics

 

Quanta, Inc. (“Quanta”) is a cutting-edge technology platform whose patented, proprietary technology harnesses advances in quantum biology to increase the potency of active ingredients. Currently, Quanta supports product formulations in pain management, anti-inflammation, skincare, agriculture, nutritional supplements, and plant-based consumables. Ultimately, Quanta’s mission is to deliver better, more effective ingredients to elevate product efficacy, reduce waste and facilitate healthier, more sustainable consumption.

 

The established resonance theory behind Quanta’s polarization process has many potential applications. From potentiating bio-ingredients to produce more-effective carbon-trapping plants to transformative anti-aging solutions Quanta’s technology has the opportunity to upend how commercial products are made and the benefits from them. Already we see multi-trillion-dollar global industries benefiting from Quanta’s technology.

 

Our proof of concept, Quanta’s market-leading CBD pain-relief rub (“Muscle Rub”), is only the first in a series of paradigm shift products to emerge from our labs. At the heart of its well-documented effectiveness is our proprietary “polarization” process, which uses electromagnetic force to markedly enhance bioactivity at the molecular level—a polarized active ingredient is more soluble and creates stronger bonds with the body’s receptors. This allows us to enhance ingredients so they work faster and more powerfully without the use of chemical by-products or cellular penetration. Quanta believes this natural solution has nearly limitless applications in the world of plant-based consumer products.

 

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Quanta is involved in ambitious projects that we believe will reshape the next wave of climate science, sustainability, nutrition, and more. Having harnessed the technology of the future, Quanta is dedicated to bringing tomorrow’s health and wellness solutions to the billions in need today.

 

Proof of Concept

 

Creating, producing and selling consumer products was never our primary focus; Quanta’s Muscle Rub was simply a means to an end - proof of concept and a revenue driver in a small emerging market as our business model took shape. Fundamentally, Quanta will be a licensing concern designed to collaborate with large brands to improve product quality and the profit margins of existing and new products. But the market needed proof and we chose to start in the under-developed category of CBD because of its speed to market.

 

Understandably, we met the same initial hurdles every start-up encounters. In addition to simply explaining quantum mechanics, we had no track record of success from a business standpoint. The immediate goal was to prove our model was defensible. Hence, we chose CBD as a launch category. This market provided protection from industry titans that may have felt threatened by such a powerful technology while allowing us to drive profits during R&D.

 

Over the last two years, we have developed and sold products largely to the medical industry, along with some consumer retail. This effort was designed to drive revenue and to prove the concept of our model: that polarizing a single ingredient can produce a demonstrably superior product that consumers find safe and effective (establish consumer appetite).

 

Discovery Synopsys

 

Using our product development process and business-to-business and direct-to-consumer sales approaches as a benchmark for future business, we developed the Quanta business model. Our technology’s unique ability to strengthen ingredients renders them more potent without added chemicals or penetrating cells means Quanta is in a first-of-its-kind position in the market. As the world’s first company focused on Quantum Biology we sit in a strong, but unique position in the market.

 

Our ability to increase ingredient efficacy by up to 500% means we are in a rare position to truly disrupt many areas of material science.

 

Quanta’s technology renders products superior to any on the market today. A 30% re-purchase rate (on one SKU alone) illustrates consumer appetite for the product.

 

Upcoming products and ventures will be designed to achieve or surpass this level of consumer benefit and uptake.

 

Quanta Business Model in 3 P’s: Potentiation, Partners, and Profits

 

After two years we believe the best possible model for the long-term success of the company is collaborating with best-in-class partners through joint ventures for new verticals, products, and research. These joint ventures may involve a jointly owned special purpose entity or they may be entirely based on contractual obligations.

 

Our mission has never been to create the best novel products on the planet. Our mission has always been to revolutionize the way formulations are developed and how products perform. We seek to work with the best product makers in the world to positively impact as many industries as possible.

 

The unique ability to increase the ingredient and product performance opens the doors for major opportunities. Higher performing ingredients mean less is needed to make a strong impact (increased margins, increase overall efficacy). We proved this with our Muscle Rub, which uses approximately 1/3 the CBD of competing products with demonstrably improved results.

 

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The level of potentiation delivered by Quanta allows our partners the unique ability to provide higher-performing products, lower material costs, more competitive pricing and increased profit margins. In short, our partners will be able to make better performing, more affordable products with a higher repeat purchase. This is true disruption and consumer utopia.

 

We aim to work with groups that specialize in manufacturing, marketing, selling and distributing existing product lines that utilize ingredients we can potentiate. Partners like this facilitate efficient market delivery of joint innovations.

 

We believe this strategy provides greater shareholder value, enhances revenue potential, defrays upfront expenses and affords us the ability to raise capital for new projects without massive dilution.

 

Ultimately, these ventures would result in licensing out our technology to other reputable brands and companies to create co-branded products whereas the term “Powered by Quanta” becomes as recognized as “Intel Inside.”

 

We believe this type of partnership will afford a company Quanta partners with:

 

  Development of emerging products with cutting edge ingredients.
     
  A product line with a true point of differentiation.
     
  New SKUs with an increased margin.
     
  Decreased cost of goods sold.

 

Simultaneously these partnerships will allow Quanta:

 

  Greater brand recognition.
     
  Increased revenue and in turn profitability.
     
  Quicker timeline to more licensing opportunities because of a track record of success.
     
  Brand to become synonymous with improving the performance of ingredients within products.

 

Manufacturing Partnerships -

 

Quanta is currently focused on partnering with large-scale manufacturers and distributors able to produce products that meet the requirements of applicable regulations IE: Good Manufacturing Practices to fulfill orders of our own product line. This type of partnership is crucial because it will afford:

 

  New product development that meets certification requirements
     
  Much larger production scale
     
  Speed to market
     
  Increased distribution and profitability

 

With our licensing capabilities, Quanta technology can render better, more efficacious products that cost less to create but command a higher purchase value because of polarized ingredients. This, in turn, allows companies to diversify their catalog of products while simultaneously providing them with a distinguished advantage. More efficacious ingredients.

 

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Government Regulation

 

We believe we are in compliance with applicable federal, state and other regulations and that we have compliance programs in place to ensure compliance going forward. There are no regulatory notifications or actions pending.

 

Results of Operations

 

Summary of Key Results

 

Results of Operations for three months ended March 31, 2020 compared to the three months ended March 31, 2019

 

Revenue

 

Net sales are comprised of wholesale sales to our retail partners and sales through our direct to consumer channel. Net sales in both channels reflect the impact of product returns as well as discounts for certain sales programs or promotions.

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Company recognized $357 in net sales. For the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company recognized $231 in net sales.

 

Expenses

 

Operating expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2020 was $1,360. The Company incurred $78 in research and development costs, and $912 in administrative and other costs associated with operations, including legal and professional fees of $67, and $382 of labor and related costs.

 

Operating expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was $350. The Company incurred $0 in research and development costs, and $163 in administrative and other costs associated with operations, including legal and professional fees of $20, and $188 of labor and related costs.

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2020, the Company recognized $316 of net other expenses.

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2019, the Company recognized $4 of net other expenses.

 

Net Loss

 

Net loss for the three months ended March 31, 2020 was $1,359. Net loss for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was $183. We recorded no provision for federal income taxes for either period.

  

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Liquidity

 

We have yet to establish any history of profitable operations. For the three ended December 31, 2020, the Company incurred a net loss of $1,359 and used cash in operating activities of $453, and at March 31, 2020, the Company had a working capital deficiency of $1,060. These factors raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the date the financial statements are issued. As a result, our independent registered public accounting firm included an explanatory paragraph in its report on our financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2019 with respect to this uncertainty. This going concern opinion could materially limit our ability to raise additional funds through the issuance of new debt or equity securities and future reports on our financial statements may also include an explanatory paragraph with respect to our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

At December 31, 2019, the Company had cash on hand in the amount of $47. Subsequent to March 31, 2020 the Company received $357 from the issuance of a convertible note payable and $80 for subscriptions to purchase shares of common stock. Management estimates that the current funds on hand will be sufficient to continue operations through the next six months. The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon improving its profitability and the continuing financial support from its shareholders. Management believes the existing shareholders or external financing will provide additional cash to meet the Company’s obligations as they become due. No assurance can be given that any future financing if needed, will be available or, if available, that it will be on terms that are satisfactory to the Company. Even if the Company can obtain additional financing, if needed, it may contain undue restrictions on its operations, in the case of debt financing, or cause substantial dilution for its stockholders, in the case of equity financing

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Our financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, or GAAP. GAAP requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts in our financial statements including various allowances and reserves for accounts receivable and inventories, the estimated lives of long-lived assets and trademarks and trademark licenses, as well as claims and contingencies arising out of litigation or other transactions that occur in the normal course of business. The following summarizes our most significant accounting and reporting policies and practices:

 

Use of estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Significant accounting estimates include certain assumptions related to, among others, impairment analysis of long-term assets, valuation allowance on deferred income taxes, assumptions used in valuing stock instruments issued for services, assumptions made in valuing derivative liabilities, and the accrual of potential liabilities. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue when risk of loss transfers to our customers and collection of the receivable is reasonably assured, typically upon delivery of products. The Company historically has offered no discounts, rebates, rights of return, or other allowances to clients which would result in the establishment of reserves against revenue.

 

The Company follows the guidance of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. ASC 606 creates a five-step model that requires entities to exercise judgment when considering the terms of contracts, which includes (1) identifying the contracts or agreements with a customer, (2) identifying our performance obligations in the contract or agreement, (3) determining the transaction price, (4) allocating the transaction price to the separate performance obligations, and (5) recognizing revenue as each performance obligation is satisfied. The Company only applies the five-step model to contracts when it is probable that the Company will collect the consideration it is entitled to in exchange for the services it transfers to its clients.

 

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Stock Compensation

 

The Company periodically issues stock options and restricted stock awards to employees and non-employees in non-capital raising transactions for services and financing costs. The Company accounts for such grants issued and vesting based on ASC 718, whereby the value of the award is measured on the date of grant and recognized as compensation expense on the straight-line basis over the vesting period. The Company recognizes the fair value of stock-based compensation within its Statements of Operations with classification depending on the nature of the services rendered.

 

The fair value of the Company’s stock options is estimated using a Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model, which uses certain assumptions related to risk-free interest rates, expected volatility, expected life of the stock options or restricted stock, and future dividends. Compensation expense is recorded based upon the value derived from the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model and based on actual experience. The assumptions used in the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model could materially affect compensation expense recorded in future periods.

 

Derivative Financial Instruments

 

The Company evaluates its financial instruments to determine if such instruments are derivatives or contain features that qualify as embedded derivatives. For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported in the statements of operations. For stock-based derivative financial instruments, the Company uses a probability weighted average Black-Scholes-Merton model to value the derivative instruments at inception and on subsequent valuation dates through the March 31, 2020, reporting date. The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is evaluated at the end of each reporting period.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

See Note 1 to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.

 

We are a smaller reporting company as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and are not required to provide the information required under this item

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We conducted an evaluation under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures. The term “disclosure controls and procedures”, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (“Exchange Act”), means controls and other procedures of a company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the company in the reports it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures also include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the company’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Based on this evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded as of March 31, 2020 that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective.

 

The matters involving internal controls and procedures that our management considered to be weaknesses under the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board were: (i) We do not have written documentation of our internal control policies and procedures, including written policies and procedures to ensure the correct application of accounting and financial reporting with respect to the current requirements of U.S. GAAP and SEC disclosure requirements; and (ii) the Company did not maintain effective policies to ensure adequate segregation of duties within its accounting processes. Specifically, due to the size of the Company and the smaller nature of department teams, opportunities are limited to segregate duties, resulting in inabilities to soundly manage segregation of job responsibilities.

 

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in internal control over financial reporting (as defined by Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) during the three months ended March 31, 2020, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings.

 

From time to time, we are a party to, or otherwise involved in, legal proceedings arising in the normal and ordinary course of business. As of the date of this report, we are not aware of any other proceeding, threatened or pending, against us which, if determined adversely, would have a material effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows or financial position.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

The recent global coronavirus outbreak could harm our business and results of operations.

 

The adverse public health developments and economic effects of the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States could adversely affect the Company’s operations as a result of quarantines, facility closures and logistics restrictions in connection with the outbreak. More broadly, the outbreak could potentially lead to an economic downturn, which would likely decrease spending, adversely affecting our business, results of operations and financial condition. The Company cannot accurately predict the effect the COVID-19 outbreak will have on the Company.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

 

Subsequent to March 31, 2020 the Company received an additional $40 in subscriptions for an additional 148,148 shares of common stock to be issued. The Company also entered into a convertible note of $357,000. As of March 31, 2020, and through the date of the financial statements, the shares had not been issued.

 

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.

 

None.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information.

 

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Item 6. Exhibits.

 

The following exhibits are incorporated into this Form 10-Q Quarterly Report:

 

Exhibit

Number

  Description
     
3.4   Certificate of Designation of Series A Preferred Stock (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.4 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on April 14, 2020)
10.13   Equity Purchase Agreement, dated as of April 9, 2020, by and between Quanta, Inc. and Oscaleta Partners LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.13 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on April 10, 2020)
10.14   Registration Rights Agreement, dated as of April 9, 2020, by and between Quanta, Inc. and Oscaleta Partners LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.14 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on April 10, 2020)
10.15   Promissory Note, dated as of April 9, 2020, issued by Quanta, Inc. in favor of Oscaleta Partners LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.15 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on April 10, 2020)
10.16   Brokerage Agreement, dated as of March 26, 2020, by and between Quanta, Inc. and Hanson Faso Sales & Marketing, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.16 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on April 10, 2020)
10.17   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated as of April 27, 2020, by and between Quanta, Inc. and the Purchasers Signatory Thereto (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.17 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on May 1, 2020)
10.18   Form of Note dated as of April 27, 2020, issued by Quanta, Inc. in favor of the Holders Thereof (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.18 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on May 1, 2020)
31.1*   Rule 13a-14(a) Certification of the Chief Executive and Financial Officer
32.1*   Section 1350 Certification of Chief Executive and Financial Officer
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document

 

* Filed along with this document

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  QUANTA, INC
   
Dated: June 19, 2020 By: /s/ Eric Rice
    Eric Rice
    Chairman, Chief Executive Officer (Principal Executive Officer and Principal Accounting Officer)

 

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